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The reason Supreme Court vacancies are getting so heated is because Congress can’t get anything done, according to one legal expert

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The reason Supreme Court vacancies are getting so heated is because Congress can't get anything done, according to one legal expert

Ruth Bader Ginsburg and other Supreme Court Justices attend Neil Gorsuch’s judicial oath ceremony in 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death and Trump’s expected nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett has ignited the third contentious showdown over a Supreme Court vacancy in just four years.

Republicans say the seat should be filled, Democrats say voters should choose, and both parties have made arguments they were on the opposite side of in previous years.

Vacancy battles have been political since America’s founding days, but are more so recently thanks to an increasingly gridlocked Congress, according to Ilya Shapiro of the libertarian Cato Institute.

Shapiro blamed the scrappier fights on Congress being unwilling to compromise and partisan judicial philosophies “at a time when the parties are more ideologically sorted than at least since the Civil War.”

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Less than two hours after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death was announced, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declared that President Donald Trump’s nominee to replace her “will receive a vote on the floor of the US Senate.”An hour before that, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer took the opposite stance , saying: “The […]

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