End the duopoly

Facebook and Twitter chart divergent paths in face of Trump threats

10

While Twitter this week slapped unprecedented fact-checks on presidential tweets, Facebook has adopted a more hands-off strategy, saying it wants to be the online equivalent of the public square, shying away from judging which politicians’ statements are true and which are false. | AFP-JIJI Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc. have both sparked the ire of Donald Trump, but the social networks have taken nearly opposite approaches to politics and the president.

While Twitter this week slapped unprecedented fact-checks on presidential tweets, Facebook has adopted a more hands-off strategy, saying it wants to be the online equivalent of the public square, shying away from judging which politicians’ statements are true and which are false.

In spite of Facebook’s strategy of accommodation, Trump named both companies in an executive order Thursday aimed at limiting liability protections for users’ posts.

The two companies have millions of users who can sway public opinion, start social-justice movements and even decide elections, but they diverge sharply on the handling of political speech on their platforms.

Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder and chief executive officer, is fond of saying that Facebook shouldn’t be “the arbiter of truth.”

Twitter took a giant step in the opposite direction last year when it banned all political […]

read more here —> www.japantimes.co.jp

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More